RANDAMWILL Music 2021
ATW2012 Jeremiah the Prophet A Song Cycle for Tenor and Piano A dramatic 3-song cycle for classical tenor and piano, this concert piece spans the prophetic calling of the young Jeremiah, his life of suffering and lament as well as the loving covenant promises of God as recorded in the biblical books of Jeremiah and Lamentations. “The Call” “The Suffering” ”The Promise”
$15.00 each
It has been an absolute pleasure to collaborate with Amy Tate Williams on the song cycle JEREMIAH THE PROPHET. It has some of the most hauntingly beautiful melody lines that I’ve ever sung or heard, combined with some lush, gorgeous piano accompaniment. The piano and the voice meld so well together. The piece is written in such a way that sets up different approaches to high notes and climaxes and long stretched-out lines in a smart way that has been a pleasure to work on. It’s a powerful piece because it is written cinematically, operatically, like a small scena or, in essence, a small one-act opera in the course of just a few minutes with these three epic pieces. They have such different tones, and, although the musical language is similar and recognizable - there’s a thread through all the music - at the same time they’re so diverse and you can really start to feel what must have been going through Jeremiah’s mind at the time he experienced these various things. In terms of preparation, these tunes are so memorable, they almost instantly become embedded in your mind and your vocal DNA. They are intuitive, like a Mozart piece. You have the melody fixed in your head immediately, then it's just a question of figuring out how to precisely execute all of the more subtle aspects of the vocal line that create such a powerful effect. Pedagogically, this music has a lot to offer, and I found myself thinking of these both as a teacher and as a performer. For example, you are asked to do most everything that a singer working at the top of his or her game would need to do to be successful while singing this music. Singing long sustained exposed lines, executing pristine pianissimi as well as Verdi or Puccini-esque forte's, singing recitative-like sections, thinking about stamina and pacing, demonstrating tremendous breath control, and utilizing the extremities of your vocal range. I could immediately imagine assigning some of this material to some of my college students to help them develop critical vocal skills in a very appealing musical package. It's so refreshing to sing new music that is so intuitive, appealing, and well-crafted. I'm grateful for the opportunity I had to get to know these pieces. Dr. Tyler Nelson Professor of Voice Blair School of Music Vanderbilt University
“The Call”
“The Suffering”
“The Promise”
PREVIEW
performed by Dr. Tyler Nelson recorded in Turner Hall, Vanderbilt University
RANDAMWILL Music 2021
$15.00 each
PREVIEW
ATW2012 Jeremiah the Prophet A Song Cycle for Tenor and Piano A dramatic 3-song cycle for classical tenor and piano, this concert piece spans the prophetic calling of the young Jeremiah, his life of suffering and lament as well as the loving covenant promises of God as recorded in the biblical books of Jeremiah and Lamentations; “The Call” “The Suffering” ”The Promise”
“The Call”
“The Suffering”
“The Promise”
It has been an absolute pleasure to collaborate with Amy Tate Williams on the song cycle JEREMIAH THE PROPHET. It has some of the most hauntingly beautiful melody lines that I’ve ever sung or heard, combined with some lush, gorgeous piano accompaniment. The piano and the voice meld so well together. The piece is written in such a way that sets up different approaches to high notes and climaxes and long stretched-out lines in a smart way that has been a pleasure to work on. It’s a powerful piece because it is written cinematically, operatically, like a small scena or, in essence, a small one-act opera in the course of just a few minutes with these three epic pieces. They have such different tones, and, although the musical language is similar and recognizable - there’s a thread through all the music - at the same time they’re so diverse and you can really start to feel what must have been going through Jeremiah’s mind at the time he experienced these various things. In terms of preparation, these tunes are so memorable, they almost instantly become embedded in your mind and your vocal DNA. They are intuitive, like a Mozart piece. You have the melody fixed in your head immediately, then it's just a question of figuring out how to precisely execute all of the more subtle aspects of the vocal line that create such a powerful effect. Pedagogically, this music has a lot to offer, and I found myself thinking of these both as a teacher and as a performer. For example, you are asked to do most everything that a singer working at the top of his or her game would need to do to be successful while singing this music. Singing long sustained exposed lines, executing pristine pianissimi as well as Verdi or Puccini-esque forte's, singing recitative-like sections, thinking about stamina and pacing, demonstrating tremendous breath control, and utilizing the extremities of your vocal range. I could immediately imagine assigning some of this material to some of my college students to help them develop critical vocal skills in a very appealing musical package. It's so refreshing to sing new music that is so intuitive, appealing, and well-crafted. I'm grateful for the opportunity I had to get to know these pieces. Dr. Tyler Nelson Professor of Voice Blair School of Music Vanderbilt University
performed by Dr. Tyler Nelson recorded in Turner Hall, Vanderbilt University